Medical Humanities: Futures (Call for Papers: 2nd Congress of the NNMHR University of Leeds 20-21 September 2018)

Medical Humanities: Futures

Call for Papers: 2nd Congress of the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds, 20-21 September 2018.

The Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research (NNMHR) was founded in 2013 with the purpose of connecting individuals and institutions working in this dynamic area of interdisciplinary research. The network numbers scholars, practitioners, health professionals, artists and health advocates amongst its members and held its first Congress at Durham University in September 2017.

The second NNMHR Congress will be held at Weetwood Hall, the University of Leeds on 20-21 September 2018. The logic of the Congress is simple: it is an opportunity for people who are passionate or even simply curious about medical humanities research to present their work, share ideas, and meet potential future colleagues and collaborators. The Congress is not limited to members of the network.

The call for contributions is now open.

  • We invite 200 word proposals for papers (20 minutes) or provocations (10 minutes) on the topic of medical humanities: futures. Presentations might address topics including: representations and imaginations of medical futures; speculative futures of medicine and health; global health cultures and the future; ideas of future health policy or practice; relationships between pasts, presents and futures; or the future of medical humanities as a discipline. As well as work being undertaken in ongoing research, we welcome presentations on research methods, impact, and engagement. Proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers are very welcome, as are those from professionals and practitioners who are actively involved in research but not based in the academy. We also welcome presentations in other/non-traditional formats (e.g. creative pieces, roundtable discussions, etc). We encourage contributions from individuals working in any discipline and at any institution, within the UK or internationally.
  • Researchers working on medical humanities projects are also invited to submit proposals for a marketplace session showcasing collaborations in the field. This was a major success in Durham and we are seeking to make it a regular feature of the Congress and the work of the NNMHR more generally. The format of this showcase is limited only by the imagination of the participating projects and we invite contributions that showcase ideas, images, publications, artefacts and other resources introducing the project and its participants.

Please submit your proposal for the Congress using this form by 25 May 2018. All proposals will be reviewed by staff at the University of Leeds, in consultation with the NNMHR Congress Steering Group, and presenters will be notified by 8 June 2018 when registrations will open.

The NNMHR Congress is funded by the Wellcome Trust and is free to attend. All refreshments will be provided, including a Congress dinner on the evening of the 20th. Five bursaries covering accommodation and travel of up to £175 will be available to support postgraduate participation at the Congress. Applications for bursaries will be considered following the final selection of panels and papers.

The congress hashtag is #NNMHR2018

If you have any questions regarding the Congress or the call for papers, please contact Amelia Defalco at the University of Leeds.

Posted on 27 Apr 2018, under News.

Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries

Title of project:

Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Sally Shuttleworth, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

Professor Chris Lintott, University of Oxford

Professor Gowan DawsonUniversity of Leicester

Julie Harvey, Natural History Museum

Paul Cooper, Natural History Museum

Dr John Tweddle, Natural History Museum

Dr Sam Alberti, Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons

Thalia Knight, Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons

Keith Moore, the Royal Society

 

Names and institutions of postdoctoral research assistants:

Dr Sally Frampton, University of Oxford

Dr Geoffrey Belknap, University of Leicester

Dr Berris Charnley, University of Oxford

Dr Jim O’Donnell, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of PhD students:

Alison Moulds, University of Oxford

Matthew Wale, University of Leicester
Funding sources:

The AHRC

 

Summary of research:

This project brings together historical and literary research in the nineteenth century with twenty-first century scientific practice, looking at the ways in which patterns of popular communication and engagement in nineteenth-century science can offer models for current practice. It is based at the Universities of Oxford and Leicester, in partnership with the Natural History Museum, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, and the Royal Society. Researchers are drawing on these institutions’ historical collections, particularly science and medical journals of the nineteenth century. They also work with their scientific communities, addressing questions about the creation and circulation of knowledge in the digital age, and looking at innovative ways of breaking through the public/professional divide.
Project website/webpage:

http://conscicom.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

3 years (December 2013- December 2017)

 

Anticipated audiences:

Historians of Science and Medicine, Cultural and Literary Historians of the Nineteenth Century, Scientific and Medical Professionals, Citizen Scientists and Patients

 

Tagged as: 

Medical Humanities, History of Science, History of Medicine, Journals, Interdisciplinarity, Interdisciplinary Research

 

 

 

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Posted on 07 Jul 2015, under Projects.

Diseases of Modern Life: Nineteenth Century Perspectives

Title of project:

Diseases of Modern Life: Nineteenth Century Perspectives

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Sally Shuttleworth, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Dr Amelia Bonea, University of Oxford

Dr Melissa Dickson, University of Oxford

Dr Jennifer Wallis, University of Oxford

 
Funding sources:

This project is supported by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme under Grant Agreement Number 340121

 

Summary of research:

This project explores medical, literary and cultural responses to perceived problems of stress and overwork in the Victorian age, anticipating many of the preoccupations of our own era. Particular areas of focus include: diseases of finance and speculation, diseases associated with particular professions, alcohol and drug addiction, travel for health, education and over-pressure in the classroom, the development of phobias and nervous disorders, and the imaginative construction of utopias and dystopias. The project aims to break through the compartmentalization of psychiatric, environmental, and literary history, and to offer new ways of contextualising the problems of modernity facing us in the twenty-first century.
Project website/webpage:

http://diseasesofmodernlife.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

5 years (2014-2019)

 

Anticipated audiences:

Historians of Medicine, Historians of Science and Technology, Cultural and Literary Historians of the Nineteenth-Century

 

Tagged as: 

Overpressure, Stress, Nerves, Medical Humanities, Interdisciplinarity, Interdisciplinary Research

 

 

 

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Posted on 19 Jun 2015, under Projects.

CMH New Generations

Title of project:

Centre for Medical Humanities New Generations

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Jane Macnaughton, Durham University

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Northern Network Steering Group:

Dr Bethan Evans, University of Liverpool

Dr Alice Hall, University of York

Dr Gavin Miller, University of Glasgow

Professor Stuart Murray, University of Leeds

Professor Ian Sabroe, University of Sheffield

Dr Anne Whitehead, Newcastle University

Dr Angela Woods, Newcastle University

Kings College Centre for Humanities and Health

Colleagues at the Wellcome Trust

 
Funding sources:

The AHRC

 

Summary of research:

Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities, in collaboration with the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research and the Wellcome Trust has set up the New Generations Programme to address an issue surfacing in the medical humanities. Emerging humanities researchers are increasingly engaging with interdisciplinary research but lack contexts in which to learn about and experience how it is done. Supported by a Collaborative Skills Development grant from the AHRC, this unique programme aims to deliver an exciting and innovative skills development package to a group of doctoral students and early career researchers in the medical humanities while facilitating the development of a supportive, interdisciplinary peer group. Additionally, the programme will create career development opportunities by enabling interaction between participants and staff in key centres of the medical humanities while engaging in discussions on the full range of medical humanities career options.

 
Project website/webpage:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/cmh/newgenerations/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

August 2014 – September 2015

 

Anticipated audiences:

Medical humanities researchers, medical humanities academics

 

Tagged as: 

medical humanities, interdisciplinary research, skills development, career development, early career researchers, doctoral students

 

Interested in hearing from:

Medical humanities institutions and centres

 

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Posted on 22 Apr 2015, under Projects.

The Life of Breath

 

Title of project:

The Life of Breath

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Jane Macnaughton, Durham University and Professor Havi Carel, University of Bristol

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Literary/cultural studies (Prof Corinne Saunders, Durham University)

Medical history: Dr Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (medical historian, Goldsmiths); Prof Tim Cole (history, Bristol)

Medical Anthropology: Dr Andrew Russell (Durham University) Dr Alice Malpass (University of Bristol)

Respiratory clinicians (Prof Ann Millar and Dr Nick Maskell, Academic Respiratory Unit, University of Bristol)

Respiratory neuroscientist: Dr James Dodd (University of Bristol)

Expert interdisciplinary facilitator and arts in health specialist (Mary Robson, Durham)

Patient representation: Bev Wears, Justin Parsons (British Lung Foundation Breathe Easy Groups).

Design and public engagement: Dr David Swann (expert in healthcare design and service transformation, University of Huddersfield).

Primary care research in COPD: Dr Veronika Williams (University of Oxford).

 

Funding sources:

Wellcome Trust Joint Senior Investigator Award

 

Summary of research:

The ‘Life of Breath’ programme (http://www.lifeofbreath.org/) aims to achieve the fullest possible understanding of breath, breathing and breathlessness by drawing on both biomedical information and on cultural, literary, historical and phenomenological research. Our goal is to use an innovative, medical humanities approach to enhance understanding of breathlessness in healthcare contexts and the effectiveness of interventions in diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in which breathlessness is a key symptom. The programme involves researchers in a range of faculties and departments at Durham University and the University of Bristol, along with clinicians and experts-by-experience.
Project website/webpage:

http://www.lifeofbreath.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

5 years : 2015-2019

 

Anticipated audiences:

Medical humanities scholars, literary/cultural scholars of the body, medical anthropologists, clinicians working in respiratory medicine, patients/carers.

 

Tagged as: 

Interdisciplinarity, medical humanities, breath, breathing, breathlessness.

 

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Posted on 13 Apr 2015, under Projects.