Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind: Investigating Disorders of Self

Title of project:

Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind: Investigating Disorders of Self

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Dr Ulrika Maude, University of Bristol

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

Dr Elizabeth Barry, University of Warwick

Dr Laura Salisbury, University of Exeter
Funding sources:

The AHRC

 

Summary of research:

‘Modernism, Medicine and the Embodied Mind’ is an interdisciplinary network that uses the radical insights of aesthetic modernism to develop dialogue with medical practice in psychiatry, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, neurology, and old age psychiatry. The project is dynamically interdisciplinary, fostering collaboration between researchers and clinicians working in Higher Education, the NHS, and international healthcare. It brings literary and arts scholars, philosophers, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, neuropsychologists, neurologists, and doctors in palliative care into dialogue with theatre practitioners, dancers and artists from across the UK, Europe and the USA, asking them to explore together the resources modernism offers for creatively understanding experiences of body and mind poorly served by realist models of the self.
The project explores the historical and discursive links between literary modernism, medical discoveries, and clinical practice. Underpinning the project is the significance of phenomenology and the first-person experience of medicine. The project considers modernism’s specific ability to speak to seemingly unruly mental and embodied states, and the conceptual ‘black hole’ of extreme old age, using performance-as-research strategies to consider how theatre and dance might help scholars and clinicians understand these states via experiential means. It also explores the role of the visual arts in communicating experiences that resist conceptual definition.

 
Project website/webpage:

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/projects/modernism-medicine-and-the-embodied-mind-investigating-disorders-of-the-self/

 

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

March 2015 to July 2016

 

Anticipated audiences:

Humanities and arts scholars and students, clinicians, healthcare practitioners, medical students

 

Tagged as: 

Modernism, medicine, psychiatry, ageing, neurology

 

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Posted on 22 Jul 2015, under Projects.

Artatomy

Title of project:

Artatomy

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Rachael Allen, visual artist and researcher

Dr Iain Keenan, Newcastle University

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

N/A

 
Funding sources:

Newcastle Institute of Creative Arts Practice Award 2014

 

Summary of research:

Funded by Newcastle Institute of Creative Arts Practice Award 2014 as part of the transdisciplinary project ‘Student partner approaches for strategic design and evaluation of artistic modelling as a teaching and learning method in anatomy education’, Artatomy hosted two exhibitions at the University’s Students Union and International Centre for Life in collaboration with Dr Iain Keenan, Rachael Allen (visual artist and researcher) and undergraduate medical students. Artatomy brings the art of anatomy as explored by Newcastle undergraduate medical and biomedical students and focuses on learning and reflection through creativity, expression and imagination, where the students were invited to engage with the broader aesthetics, ethics and sensorial experience of anatomy.

“Giving them the chance to explore their creative side on their own terms, Artatomy has helped them re-connect with the process of drawing that they may not be using much in their studies or in their day to day life – and in some cases haven’t used since they were at school. The artwork they’ve produced is rich in imagination, skill and expression, and is indicative of the true potential and value of art when students are given the choice to explore and participate.” (Rachael Allen)
Project website/webpage:

http://www.life.org.uk/whats-on/artatomy#.VazlE_nbhjs

https://twitter.com/artatomy

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

2014-2015

 

Anticipated audiences:

Medical educators, medical students, artists

 

Tagged as: 

Anatomy, medical education, visual arts 

 

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Lessons in Anatomy: Dissecting medicine and health through visual and literary arts

Title of project:

Lessons in Anatomy: Dissecting medicine and health through visual and literary arts

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Rachael Allen, visual artist and researcher

Dr Eleanor Holmes, GP, clinical educator and writer – pen name Eliot North

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

N/A

 
Funding sources:

a-n New Collaboration Bursary

 

Summary of research:

Rachael Allen joined forces with Dr Eleanor Holmes to investigate the creative potential for collaborative engagement across the visual and literary arts through the exchange of experiences as artist and writer, whilst exploring the interface between medicine, health, the arts and humanities. The bursary subsidised valuable time exploring each other’s creative disciplines and methodologies – drawing, sculpture, creative writing and teaching – and specific research interests – anatomy, pathophysiology, medical education, clinical practice and bioethics – to inspire new ideas for joint visual and literary outcomes.

“We met as strangers from very different worlds (medicine and art) with contrasting backgrounds and experiences (doctor and patient) but found common languages with which to negotiate our beliefs and perspectives on human health, morbidity and mortality. The collaboration created an intimate space for us to share our own narratives, life stories and emotions that surfaced through our interactions. We are now friends. Our unfolding conversations drive our ongoing ‘Lessons in Anatomy’, illuminating not only the relationship between the arts and medicine but also the fine line separating the dead and the living, doctor and patient, health and illness, as well as the relationship between two women with very different views and experiences of mortality.”

 
Project website/webpage:

http://www.a-n.co.uk/artists_talking/projects/single/4000721

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

November 2013 – July 2014

 

Anticipated audiences:

Medical Humanities scholars, visual artists, writers, General Practitioners

 

Would be interested in hearing from…

All interest in the project welcome – comments, contributions, research suggestions, funding opportunities.

 

Tagged as: 

Creative arts, collaboration, anatomy, pathology, medical education

 

 

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Fashionable Diseases: Medicine, Literature and Culture c. 1660-1832

Title of project:

Fashionable Diseases: Medicine, Literature and Culture c. 1660-1832

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Clark Lawlor, Northumbria University

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

Dr Jonathan Andrews, Newcastle University

Professor Allan Ingram, Northumbria University

Dr Leigh Wetherall Dickson, Northumbria University

Dr James Kennaway, Newcastle University

Dr Anita O’Connell, Northumbria University

 
Funding sources:

The Leverhulme Trust

 

Summary of research:

In the eighteenth century, as well as our own, certain diseases could be construed as endowing a sick person with some social or cultural cachet popularly associated with the illness. Melancholy could lend an air of creativity, gout could indicate class and wealth, and nerves could suggest a fashionable sensibility. A slight illness and enough wealth to travel could lead one to the spas and seaside resorts that, outside of London, formed the centres of fashionable society, or perhaps even lead abroad for warmer climes. As such, fashionable diseases also became the object of stigma, satire and allegations of fakery. They could be linked to the putative artificiality of ‘manners,’ modishness and the posturing of the beau monde. As Alexander Pope’s poetic satire says of women in the ‘Cave of Spleen,’ ‘The fair ones feel such maladies as these, When each new night-dress gives a new disease.’ Yet while social discourses might define it as such, the afflicted might not find the experience of such diseases fashionable at all, but rather a reality of painful suffering.

The ‘Fashionable Diseases’ project interrogates the meanings of the word ‘fashionable’ when applied to disease, and particularly explores the ways in which the medicine, literature and culture of the eighteenth century define and represent often debilitating diseases as fashionable. It seeks to discover how labels alter our conceptions of disease and provide narratives that may be at variance with actual patient experience, or that might even construct that experience. We are especially interested in the role of literary writing in this ‘construction’ of a template for the experience of disease by sufferers. Our research aims to explore the differing discourses and representations of illnesses in the long eighteenth century to deliver a better understanding of the fashionability of disease in our own time.

 
Project website/webpage:

http://fashionablediseases.info

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

May 2013 – May 2016

 

Anticipated audiences:

Academic: literature, history, art, music, psychology, medical history, medicine; Non-academic: those interested in history of ideas and eighteenth-century history

 

Would be interested in hearing from…

Anyone wishing to collaborate, participate in workshops, come along to our events or anyone with similar interests. Please do get in touch.

 

Tagged as: 

fashion, disease, eighteenth century, sensibility, sociability

 

 

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Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities

Title of project:

Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Dr. Gavin Miller, University of Glasgow

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

n/a

 
Funding sources:

The Wellcome Trust (Seed Award)

 

Summary of research:

The project investigates the significance of science fiction for the medical humanities, and is intended to pathfind for a future, large-scale research project.
Science fiction isn’t confined to novels, short stories, and cinema; it also gives us a style and substance for our visions of medical progress. This project doesn’t investigate only the familiar genre elements of narrative fiction, cinema and TV. It also explores the so-called ‘technoscientific imaginary’, and its imagining of future possibilities enabled by biomedical progress.
The project’s activities include:
A series of themed workshops, and a concluding conference, consolidating a network of interested researchers, clinicians, and writers.
An online database of primary and secondary resources to aid future research.
A themed special issue of BMJ Medical Humanities on ‘Science Fiction and the Medical Humanities’
A creative writing competition, with successful entrants appearing in a competition anthology.

 
Project website/webpage:

http://scifimedhums.glasgow.ac.uk

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

September 2015 to August 2016

 

Anticipated audiences:

Those involved in the medical humanities, literary studies, bioethics, science studies and film studies.

 

Would be interested in hearing from…

Academics, clinicians, creative writers

 

Tagged as: 

science fiction, technoscience

 

 

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Posted on 16 Jul 2015, under Projects.

Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries

Title of project:

Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Sally Shuttleworth, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of co-investigators/ collaborators:

Professor Chris Lintott, University of Oxford

Professor Gowan DawsonUniversity of Leicester

Julie Harvey, Natural History Museum

Paul Cooper, Natural History Museum

Dr John Tweddle, Natural History Museum

Dr Sam Alberti, Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons

Thalia Knight, Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons

Keith Moore, the Royal Society

 

Names and institutions of postdoctoral research assistants:

Dr Sally Frampton, University of Oxford

Dr Geoffrey Belknap, University of Leicester

Dr Berris Charnley, University of Oxford

Dr Jim O’Donnell, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of PhD students:

Alison Moulds, University of Oxford

Matthew Wale, University of Leicester
Funding sources:

The AHRC

 

Summary of research:

This project brings together historical and literary research in the nineteenth century with twenty-first century scientific practice, looking at the ways in which patterns of popular communication and engagement in nineteenth-century science can offer models for current practice. It is based at the Universities of Oxford and Leicester, in partnership with the Natural History Museum, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, and the Royal Society. Researchers are drawing on these institutions’ historical collections, particularly science and medical journals of the nineteenth century. They also work with their scientific communities, addressing questions about the creation and circulation of knowledge in the digital age, and looking at innovative ways of breaking through the public/professional divide.
Project website/webpage:

http://conscicom.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

3 years (December 2013- December 2017)

 

Anticipated audiences:

Historians of Science and Medicine, Cultural and Literary Historians of the Nineteenth Century, Scientific and Medical Professionals, Citizen Scientists and Patients

 

Tagged as: 

Medical Humanities, History of Science, History of Medicine, Journals, Interdisciplinarity, Interdisciplinary Research

 

 

 

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Posted on 07 Jul 2015, under Projects.

Diseases of Modern Life: Nineteenth Century Perspectives

Title of project:

Diseases of Modern Life: Nineteenth Century Perspectives

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Sally Shuttleworth, University of Oxford

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Dr Amelia Bonea, University of Oxford

Dr Melissa Dickson, University of Oxford

Dr Jennifer Wallis, University of Oxford

 
Funding sources:

This project is supported by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Programme under Grant Agreement Number 340121

 

Summary of research:

This project explores medical, literary and cultural responses to perceived problems of stress and overwork in the Victorian age, anticipating many of the preoccupations of our own era. Particular areas of focus include: diseases of finance and speculation, diseases associated with particular professions, alcohol and drug addiction, travel for health, education and over-pressure in the classroom, the development of phobias and nervous disorders, and the imaginative construction of utopias and dystopias. The project aims to break through the compartmentalization of psychiatric, environmental, and literary history, and to offer new ways of contextualising the problems of modernity facing us in the twenty-first century.
Project website/webpage:

http://diseasesofmodernlife.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

5 years (2014-2019)

 

Anticipated audiences:

Historians of Medicine, Historians of Science and Technology, Cultural and Literary Historians of the Nineteenth-Century

 

Tagged as: 

Overpressure, Stress, Nerves, Medical Humanities, Interdisciplinarity, Interdisciplinary Research

 

 

 

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Posted on 19 Jun 2015, under Projects.

CMH New Generations

Title of project:

Centre for Medical Humanities New Generations

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Jane Macnaughton, Durham University

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Northern Network Steering Group:

Dr Bethan Evans, University of Liverpool

Dr Alice Hall, University of York

Dr Gavin Miller, University of Glasgow

Professor Stuart Murray, University of Leeds

Professor Ian Sabroe, University of Sheffield

Dr Anne Whitehead, Newcastle University

Dr Angela Woods, Newcastle University

Kings College Centre for Humanities and Health

Colleagues at the Wellcome Trust

 
Funding sources:

The AHRC

 

Summary of research:

Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities, in collaboration with the Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research and the Wellcome Trust has set up the New Generations Programme to address an issue surfacing in the medical humanities. Emerging humanities researchers are increasingly engaging with interdisciplinary research but lack contexts in which to learn about and experience how it is done. Supported by a Collaborative Skills Development grant from the AHRC, this unique programme aims to deliver an exciting and innovative skills development package to a group of doctoral students and early career researchers in the medical humanities while facilitating the development of a supportive, interdisciplinary peer group. Additionally, the programme will create career development opportunities by enabling interaction between participants and staff in key centres of the medical humanities while engaging in discussions on the full range of medical humanities career options.

 
Project website/webpage:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/cmh/newgenerations/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

August 2014 – September 2015

 

Anticipated audiences:

Medical humanities researchers, medical humanities academics

 

Tagged as: 

medical humanities, interdisciplinary research, skills development, career development, early career researchers, doctoral students

 

Interested in hearing from:

Medical humanities institutions and centres

 

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Posted on 22 Apr 2015, under Projects.

Hubbub

Title of project:

Hubbub (at The Hub at The Wellcome Collection)

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Dr Felicity Callard, Durham University

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Professor Charles Fernyhough, Durham University

Ms Claudia Hammond, freelance

Dr Daniel Margulies, Max Planck Institute for Human, Cognitive & Brain Sciences

Dr James Wilkes, Durham University
Funding sources:

The Wellcome Trust

 

Summary of research:

Hubbub is an international team of scientists, humanists, artists, clinicians, public health experts, broadcasters and public engagement professionals. We explore the dynamics of rest, noise, tumult, activity and work, as they operate in mental health, neuroscience, the arts and the everyday. We are based in London as the first residents of The Hub at Wellcome Collection from October 2014 to July 2016.

Our interdisciplinary project was awarded a £1m grant by the Wellcome Trust. The grant-holding institution is Durham University, and the project also draws on the resources of The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, and the University of York.

The Hub at Wellcome Collection is an exciting new space that will provide resources and a stimulating space for researchers and other creative minds to collaborate on a project that will explore medicine in historical and cultural contexts. The Hub will make a central contribution to the Trust’s vision of improving human and animal health and be a flagship interdisciplinary environment that nurtures this approach.

 
Project website/webpage:

http://hubbubgroup.org/

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

We are residents of The Hub until end of July 2016

 

Anticipated audiences:

Humanities researchers, social scientists, artists, cognitive neuroscientists, members of the public interested in questions of rest, work, noise, tumult, employees of The Wellcome Trust

 

Tagged as: 

rest, noise, work, interdisciplinary

 

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Posted on 17 Apr 2015, under Projects.

Metaphor in End of Life Care

Title of project:

Metaphor in End of Care Life

 

Name and institution of principle investigators:

Professor Elena Semino, Lancaster University

 

Names and institutions of co investigators/collaborators:

Dr Andrew Hardie, Lancaster University

Dr Veronika Koller,Lancaster University

Professor Sheila Payne, Lancaster University

Dr Paul Rayson, Lancaster University

 

Funding sources:

The Economic and Social Research Council

 

Summary of research:

The aim of this project is to investigate the use of metaphor in the experience of end of life care in the UK. We have studied the metaphors used by members of different stakeholder groups (patients, unpaid family carers and healthcare professionals) in a 1.5-million-word corpus consisting of interviews and contributions to online forums. We have addressed the following research questions:

A. How do members of different stakeholders groups (health professionals, patients and unpaid family carers) use metaphor to talk about their experiences, attitudes and expectations of end-of-life care (e.g. palliative treatment, preparations for dying, etc.)?
B. What does the use of metaphor by these stakeholder groups suggest about (a) the experiences and needs of the members of these groups and their mutual relationships, and (b) the nature of metaphor as a linguistic and cognitive phenomenon?

The method we have employed to identify and analyse metaphor in our data is both qualitative and quantitative. Our approach includes the exploitation of an online semantic annotation tool developed by a member of the team, which has enabled us to identify metaphorical expressions more systematically than is possible with other methods for the study of metaphor in large data sets.
Project website/webpage:

http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/melc/index.php

 

Anticipated time frame of project:

2012 – 2014

 

Anticipated audiences:

Linguists, healthcare professionals, charities.

 

Tagged as: 

metaphor, cancer, end of life

 

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